You are beginning to feel like your life has become overwhelming and nothing is turning out right. Then, you hear of this amazing new drug everyone is talking about, perhaps this can turn the tables in your favour.

 

But this is Wrong.

Acutally, this is not the way that most addictions begin. For the most part, a first-time drug user does not feel the need to take drugs to make themselves feel better.  They have not taken the drug, so how will they know how it will make them feel?

First-time drug use rarely begins with a well thought out plan. In most cases, the party scene is the primary trigger for drug use. Most often, you will show up at a party where they expect alcohol to be the main attraction, but quite suddenly, someone pulls out a small baggie of white powder. Before you know it, you will need to turn to Addiction Care.

This is cocaine. This is something you have never seen before. Then, you see your friends trying it, so it only makes sense that you will try as well.

Someone begins to deftly create a fascinating array of small white lines on a mirror. Another person produces a rolled-up bill and the white lines disappear. Your friend follows suit and then the mirror is passed to you.

This is always an exciting moment. Your hands are a bit sweaty; your heart is racing and suddenly everything you have learned and been taught is being questioned. What to do next?

Then You Pull that Line of White Power into Your Nose and Savour the Sensation.

It is a strange kind of exhilaration. Your body vibrates with inexplicable energy and you feel slightly jittery. Your hands begin to tingle and you feel the urge to get up and dance to the music in a way you have never felt before. Suddenly, the entire atmosphere of the party has changed, everyone is happy and you have never felt so fully engaged and connected with the people around you.

But within Ten to Fifteen Minutes, the Feeling is Gone.

Then you begin to feel the exact opposite. The body is sluggish, the energy you were savouring has slowed down and it almost seems like the party atmosphere has died as well. But nothing has actually changed, the music is still playing and people are still moving about in party mode. Your friend comes to sit with you and you explain the sudden difference you are noticing. They laugh and tell you that all you need is one more dose of that magic white powder.

This is how the addiction to cocaine begins.

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Addictions are not a life sentence. Within thirty days you can kick this habit. A rehab centre has the treatment plans and support of group therapy to help you learn to manage this habit.

Anxiety is the first feeling that begins with the mere mention of cocaine, But, is that what you really need or even what you want?

As you are thinking about your options, another friend shows up and motions you to the counter where another set of white lines awaits. You are given the rolled bill and presented to a thin white line and soon it disappears into your nose. Just like that, the feeling has returned and soon your heart and body is beating once more to the exhilarating beat of the music.

What we have described here is a common situation that many will experience. Not everyone who follows this pattern will begin a life of addiction, but it does increase the likelihood. Peer pressure and exposure to the substance play a heavy role in cultivating an addiction. There is the pressure to do what others do and engage with them on their vibrant cocaine-fueled level.

You May Think to Yourself, “Just One More Try,” or “This is Not a Regular Thing, I Only do This When I am Partying with Friends.”

But no matter the drug, the chances for addiction are always the same. The urge to partake can be even stronger if you find yourself in the same situation and the same group of friends. Some people have the capacity to fight the urge or even function well and continue their normal life even while under the influence of these substances. But you have to remember that the more you try these drugs the stronger the pull will become as you develop a physical dependence on them.

The body becomes accustomed to using these drugs and soon the brain will adapt itself to cooperate with regular drug use.